Influencers — we love them, we don’t love them. We love their genuine product recommendations, the way some make us laugh, and their gorgeous photography that inspire our next vacation. We don’t love the vapid sponsored-post-after-sponsored post, and the overly cheery confections they constantly serve us. Wherever you stand, influencers have platforms that can reach and educate people. And right now, they’re changing the way they create and share content.

In the wake of the brutal slaying of George Floyd, a 46-year-old African-American man who was killed by Minneapolis police officers (Derek Chauvin in particular) while under arrest after a deli employee accused Floyd of buying cigarettes with a counterfeit $20 bill — Black Lives Matter protests have been demonstrating all over the U.S., and the world.

People are showing the fu*k up. Not just in physical form, but all over social media. Brands and huge corporations like Netflix and Live Nation are showing their support for Black Lives; as are celebrities, musicians, public figures, bloggers & influencers.

While I do take part in occasional sponsored posts, I do not identify as an influencer. I built my name over 12 years ago as a music blogger for my first blog Grimy Goods. I am aware of my two Instagrams (@grimydiapers and @grimygoods) and the effect they have on my audiences. I have always used my music blog’s Instagram as a voice for more than just cool music. I’m no stranger to dipping into social issues, racism and politics, and I have brought that full transparency (aka #RealTalk) to my personal Instagram @grimydiapers. I’ve been trolled, I’ve been criticized, I’ve been praised, I’ve been educated — it’s all part of having an audience.

My skin is brown. I am first generation, daughter of immigrants. Despite the injustices myself and my parents have experienced, I have passing-white privilege. I was recently educated on this. My daughter is fair-skinned with blue eyes. There were times during those hazy postpartum days where I actually questioned if she was mine. “Wait, she popped out of my vagina,” I would remind myself. “She is my child.”

She is my child and it is my duty to teach her the importance of race, racism and being anti-racist. She is extremely aware of our different colored skin tones, why I’m not her color, why nana (my mother) is not the same color as gaga (my husband’s mother). She knows we are different. Even though she is not even 3-years-old, I have always had conversations with her explaining why our skin tones are different. I constantly tell her how lucky she is and that other children don’t have the same toys, foods, home, and experiences as she does. My mother raised me this same way; to be aware of my privilege while showing compassion.

It’s a very challenging topic to talk to my daughter about especially since she is so young and has been taught that all skin tones are beautiful and why some of her family have different colors; however, it is not enough. My husband and I will continue to teach her about race and racism, while being mindful about our every day actions and how she absorbs them. Our children are like sponges, they absorb every bit of us, especially when we think they’re not paying attention.

While I educate myself and my family, I also need to educate my audience. I have platforms, and you best believe I use them for the greater good: and that includes Black Lives Matter, sharing black stories, sharing black music and more. After sharing my first post in support of George Floyd and Black Lives Matter, I had hoped to have seen more movement amongst my Instagram community, but many were still silent.

A few days later, I shared a second Instagram post and I mentioned: “If you have a platform to educate others and you’re not speaking up, you’re part of the problem.⁣⁣ I see you … and I’m waiting. We’re all waiting.⁣⁣.⁣⁣

I’m moved and inspired to see so may influencers and content creators genuinely supporting Black Lives Matter. I’m not talking about those that are being vague and failing to mention the very important words that need to be said, that need to be heard loud and clear.

My heart is warmed by those of you sharing, educating and not tipy-toeing around the words that need to be mentioned when you’re trying to show your support: Black Lives Matter, George Floyd, police brutality, anti-racism, Breonna Taylor⁣⁣⁣⁣, Ahmuad Arbery⁣⁣⁣⁣, Christian Cooper … Merely sharing some “injustice” artwork without addressing the key words that need to be mentioned to truly understand and support Black Lives — is just another ride on the bandwagon.

Below are some of my favorite influencers, bloggers, content creators and public figures who I actively follow and whom have showed their genuine support for Black Lives. They are fighting the good fight, they’re educating others, they’re seeking to be educated. I urge you to follow these humans. They have all brought some happiness to my digital life, and in-person life.

Also, if you need help on how to talk to your kids about race, racism and beyond, I can’t recommend enough The Conscious Kid. They are doing great work. Follow them, donate to their Patreon and share them.

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Dr. Margaret A. Hagerman // “As explicit racism frequents our news and our communities, white parents have concerns about how to raise white kids who are kind, compassionate and, importantly, not racist. The advice they most often receive is simple: talk more to your kids about race and racism. This is certainly important. But I have seen first-hand that it is not enough. White kids learn about race as a result of their own independent experiences — not just conversations. Their lived experience and their interactions with peers, teachers, neighbors, coaches, siblings and strangers matter greatly. The choices parents make about how to set up children’s lives influence their kids’ ideas about race and racism. The neighborhood they live in, the school they attend, and the activities they participate in set the parameters for how kids understand race. And this is true whether parents are consciously aware that these choices matter or not, & regardless of what parents explicitly say about race. Everyday behaviors of white parents also matter: when to lock the car doors, what conversations to have at the dinner table, what books & magazines to have around the house, how to react to news headlines, who to invite over for summer cookouts, whether and how to answer questions posed by kids about race, who parents are friends with themselves, when to roll one’s eyes, what media to consume, how to respond to overtly racist remarks made by Grandpa at a family dinner and where to spend leisure time. (Restaurants, vacation destinations & community events can be deliberately and by-default mostly white — or purposefully not.) Parents may not even be aware that they are conveying ideas about race through these behaviors, but children learn from them all the time. The conversations parents have with their white children about race and racism matter — it’s just that so does everything else parents do. Rather than focusing solely on what they say to kids about race, white parents should think more critically and carefully about how what they do on an everyday basis may actually reproduce the very racist ideas & forms of racial inequality that they say they seek to challenge.”

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Some of my favorite influencers speaking up:

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I look at these faces of my kids, and think of how George Floyd cried out “mama” in his final moments. How in his desperation, he wanted the woman who gave him life, to save him from death. Even right now as I type this, I am crying. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ I feel that even tho I do not have the biggest platform, I do have a platform. And to be silent would be an injustice to George and to all the black men and women who were murdered before him. As a black woman, myself, I can’t stay quiet. This will not be a nice post. It will not be kind. But hopefully it will prompt others to educate themselves. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ “Instead of feeling protected by police, many African Americans are intimidated and live in daily fear that their children will face abuse, arrest and death at the hands of police officers who may be acting on implicit biases or institutional policies based on stereotypes and assumptions of black criminality.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ That right there⬆️ is the honest reality of what black people (like myself) have to deal with on a regular basis, in this country. So I want to keep this short and to the point. Because it’s really simple and it’s not that hard to comprehend. Black👏🏾Lives👏🏾Matter👏🏾. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Does that phrase make you uncomfortable? Or make you want to cry out (ignorantly), “All lives matter!!”? If it does, swipe left. Read it. And then check your white privilege. Stop being selfish. This isn’t about YOU. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The simple FACT is that in order for ALL lives to matter, BLACK LIVES NEED TO MATTER. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ And it is clear (especially with recent events AND past events), that my life and the lives of my fellow black men and women, do not matter in this country. They have not mattered for a long time. And enough is enough. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Stop deflecting and focusing on the riots. Stop being deliberately ignorant and wake the hell up. Racism has been a longstanding theme in this country. It’s getting worse, instead of getting better. Change needs to happen. Now. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ If you believe otherwise, you are willfully ignorant and a part of the problem and can exit stage left by clicking the unfollow button. #BlackLivesMatter

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There comes a TIME when we must be so fed up we make sure history doesn’t repeat again. . .Dear whites, lets please use our white privilege and stand against this like the next picture all the TIME. Not just today but everyday. Stand up and speak out! Talk to your black friends and your community and see where your energy can go to help. Have the conversations so you can understand what this means. We need your help. This IS your problem as it is mine. Listen. Be brave. Stand up. Learn. Fight. Be disruptive. Be an ally! Black and brown lives need our outrage too! Their lives depend on it in this unjust world. 💔🩸 . .Fight for their equality so that we can all live together and be one for our kids for our future for humanity. What the actual fhuckkkkkkk! Seriously?! 💕💪💪🏻💪🏽💪🏾💪🏿 💕 ——————————————- . . . . #blacklivesmatter #dearwhitepeople #blm #timemagazine #ripgeorgefloyd #bebrave #fightforequality #lovethyneighbor #protest #protests2020 #protests #protesters #whiteprivelege #fightforwhatsright #equality #standtogether #riots #staywoke

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I’m weary of the names y’all keep saying and those you leave out. I’m weary of the folks that has all of you get activated around and brings you to protest in mass. I don’t care to hear, “make your activism intersectional” I want some work done around why it’s not! Why are people doing press conferences crying only mentioning Black cis men. Why are folks with huge and small platforms ONLY advocating justice for George Floyd. Why are news outlets barely mentioning, Tony McDade’s or Nina Pop’s name. YOUR SILENCE IS LOUD AND CLEAR. It’s very clear who folks believe shouldn’t be murdered and who should. White supremacy self selects who you care about and who you mourn, don’t let it. ⠀ The police officers name who murdered Tony McDade has still NOT been released. Give them a ring today and demand justice for Tony McDade, 850-410-7000 Rest in power Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade, Nina POP and the countless Black femmes and Black trans people who never make the news or get a protest #ALLBlacklivesmatter

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“You’re silence is louder than you think.” . I was quiet on this matter until yesterday because my heart was hurting so badly and I was searching for the right words to say but there are no right words and I will not turn my back on racism. In the last two weeks I have seen three videos of three INNOCENT black men Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd & Christian Cooper; Two showing the fatal outcomes of Ahmaud Arbery and George Floyd being murdered and one showing a woman making a false racially motivated 911 call; what did she want to happen to Christian Cooper?! These are just three recent incidents; innocent lives are being taken and we should all be sickened by the injustices happening in our country. The injustices that take place every day for the black community. I will use my voice to stand as an ally for the black community and I will use this platform however I can for change. I will raise my children to stand with bravery against social injustices, I will teach them to be actively non racist. Head to @shaunking Instagram and please click the link, he makes it easy to put action behind intention Justice can be served if we all unite. #enoughisenough #blacklivesmatter #justiceforgeorgefloyd

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I have spoken a lot on stories about everything that is happening, but that isn’t enough. Stories disappear in 24 hours and I want to commit my thoughts to my feed permanently. Because it is important. Because it is real. Because it is my life. Because I don’t have the luxury of burying my head in the sand and this being just a moment, something that is just too hard to deal with, something that can be a brief and sad thought, and then I go about my life. ⁣⁣ ⁣ My fear as a black mother and a black wife is palpable. It always crosses my mind when my husband leaves to go somewhere if today will be the day I lose him. If today will be the day where a cop pulls a gun on him (this has happened to Sean), if today will be the day a cop decides that he shouldn’t be able to breathe. I worry about my children, my little ones once they aren’t so small and cute anymore, and are seen by many as a threat. I worry about my oldest who already is getting the face of a man but still has a child’s heart and I know I cannot protect him forever. I think about Tamir Rice, about Aiyana Jones, mere babies, murdered. I cannot protect any of them. I cannot even protect myself. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ I worry about myself. Racism and police brutality isn’t just a black mans issue. Tell that to Breonna Taylor. Tell that to Sandra Bland. Tell that to the many, many black trans women murdered, all who’s stories don’t get lifted up but are important and need to be heard. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ And I am tired. I’m tired and I am angry. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Silence is violence. Silence helps nothing. It is not enough to not be a racist. If you are not actively anti-racist, you are part of this problem. If you are white and do not know what to do, there is a whole internet at your fingertips. There is no excuse. I am tired of excuses. I’m tired of apologies. I’m tired of people telling me about their guilt. I just want you to do the work. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ If you have any influence on here, use it. If you need an example, @classycleanchic is a perfect example of a white influencer using her platform to learn and spread awareness. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Speak up. Speak out. This needs to end. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ I want to live. I want to breathe. ⁣

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In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. — Martin Luther King Jr. I have unearned privileges as an Asian American because I can do all of these things without thinking twice about it… I can go jogging (#AmaudArbery 2020). I can relax in the comfort of my own home (#AtatianaJefferson 2019 and #BothemSean 2018). I can have a cellphone (#StephonClark 2018). I can leave a party to get to safety (#JordanEdwards 2017). I can read a book in my own car (#KeithScott 2016). I can break down on a public road with car problems (#CoreyJones 2015). I can breathe (#EricGarner 2015). I can live (#FreddieGray 2015). I can shop at Walmart (#JohnCrawford 2014) . I can ask for help after being in a car crash (#JonathanFerrell 2013). I can play loud music (#JordanDavis2012). I can walk home with Skittles (#TrayvonMartin 2012). I can sleep (#AiyanaJones 2010) I CAN BE ARRESTED WITHOUT THE FEAR OF BEING MURDERED. #GeorgeFloyd 2020 Take a minute to consider a Black person’s experience today. #BlackLivesMatter Take a minute to consider another person’s experience today. We are all humans. No matter the color of our skin, our religion, sexuality or any other differences among us, we all bleed red. We all love. And we can all choose not to hate. We can choose to have the tough conversations about racism that is needed.

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I’ve heard and seen a lot of shaming going around on social media. I think the shaming makes things worse, not better. It divides + does not unite. While there are people who will never understand or choose to learn and grow, there are a whole lot of people who want to learn but are afraid to ask questions because they will be ridiculed for doing so. • With that being said, I continually want to walk forward + create a space to gently educate + share information with grace + patience + ultimately, with the peace of God leading me. • Yesterday, I spoke in my stories some insightful explanations as to why the movement + hashtag #alllivesmatter is not helpful or unifying. Some people will choose to not open their heart for another perspective and for others, I hope this enlightens you + is a place of growth for you. • From the words of my husband @sebornyancy: “When people say black lives matter it’s not to say that black lives are the only lives that matter. It’s to draw attention to the fact that black lives are undervalued in our country and are far more likely to be ended by police. It’s to point out the racial inequality that has been the reality of our country for decades. Of course all lives matter, but let’s focus on the group of people who have been suffering at the hands of our nation. By saying all lives matter, you take away from the very thing we are trying to fight for.” • From @jamienunnally: “BLACK LIVES MATTER. Let’s talk about this phrase. I’ve seen many of my white friends respond with “all lives matter” when they see or hear this. Which, of course is true – all lives do matter. But that’s a really terrible response. Let me explain why: Imagine you live on a street with 4 houses and yours catches on fire. You call 911 and while you wait on them to arrive, you run outside and yell to your neighbors for help. You can see that they hear you but no one seems to be responding. You look at them in anger and say “Come on guys, my house matters!” They respond “Hey buddy, ALL houses matter!” Right. But one is ON FIRE. See how that’s an inappropriate response? As good neighbors it is the duty of other races to help.”

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dear @fashionnova, as a brand I signed a long term contract with, advertise and co-sign online, why are you silent during this tragic time in our country? where is your voice for us when when you benefit largely off black influencers? black fashion? black trends? black models? black bodies working in your establishments? where is your outrage over your millions of customers, men and women alike? where is your relief for families destroyed by police brutality and unchecked injustices? your team reached out to me to make sure I “got my posts up this week” or my contract would be voided. I’m very happy to post about this as a ‘fashionnovapartner’ – let us know, we’re waiting. thank you.

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“Silence and inaction…you’re complicit.” Police Chief Arradondo, Minneapolis PD, his response/opinion of the guilt of the three remaining officers involved in the murder of George Floyd. . You have a voice. You have a duty to speak out against unthinkable injustices. This is not the world we want our children to grow up knowing. We have to do better. We MUST do better. They learn from watching & listening to us. It is our duty. Is it hard to know what is the right thing to do or say at times like this?? Y E S. But doing or saying nothing is too dangerous. Your silence makes you complicit. . . Some resources for you: @naacp @blklivesmatter @changedotorg @aclu_nationwide @colorofchange @blackvisionscollective . . #blacklivesmatter✊🏽✊🏾✊🏿 #prayersforhealing

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I, like so many other’s, have been struggling with what to say about the innocent lives we’ve lost recently, for fear of saying the wrong thing. However, I also know that staying silent about the racism that still runs so deep in this country does absolutely nothing. . I can’t imagine having to worry about my daughters being shot at when they go outside for a run, or having to watch one of them beg for their breath at the hands of the very people that are supposed to protect us. It hurts. All of it hurts and we can do better. I know I can do better. . I’ll start with our girls, by making sure we have conversations about race, that they understand the suffering that people have endured over the years just because of their skin color. I will teach them the importance of standing up against the injustices that happen to BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) everyday. . I will continue to educate myself, to use my voice and my privilege to show my support for the black community. I’m reading, I’m listening and I’m learning. If you want to show your support as well but don’t know where to start, start with the same thing. Get educated. Follow people that actively speak out against this. Ask questions. Get uncomfortable. . What we shouldn’t do though, is nothing. . Black Lives Matter ❤️ . . . 🎨: Artwork by @mirabellecreations . . . . #blacklivesmatter #whiteprivilege #enoughisenough #justiceforgeorgefloyd

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Why you haven’t heard from me this week and why it is NOT OKAY. // This week, we finally got the “okay” from my nieces Cystic Fibrosis doctors to visit her. We drove up on Thursday, and I can’t tell you the euphoria I’ve felt being with her since not seeing her for literally “half her life.” I’ve been so so afraid that because of Covid, I’d completely miss being around her as a baby… that no one in my family would ever see me pregnant. On the day we were to leave, we found out my husband, Alex, lost his job… We are here with our family for just two days, trying to focus on the joy of new life… Margaret’s and the baby growing inside of me. Trying not to let the brief family time pass us by… and to not internalize any stress for the babies sake. I’ve spent the past week SILENT, for those reasons… but today it is so important to let you in on what’s also been on my heart. I’m sorry for not speaking up sooner. Amidst the ups and downs and fears and worries we have about our own lives, this week something much bigger than us needs to take precedent. I’ve been searching for the right words, the right way to say things… but in “not wanting to get it wrong” I haven’t said anything yet at all. My heart hurts for the pain our country is in. My heart is ripped open for George Floyd and his family and the families of every life lost for reasons that appall and disgust me. We need to do better. I need to do better. I have a voice and a platform, and I need to shout as loudly as I can. I need to acknowledge my privilege and discuss it. I need to encourage you to explore it along side me and every capacity. For so long, I’m been silent because I feel powerless. What can I do? It’s so beyond me. The roots of the issues run so deep. How can one person make change? “I am no longer accepting the things I cannot change. I am changing the things I cannot accept.” Angela Y. Davis I may not have the words, or the answers. But I’m going to take TIME this week to educate myself and to learn the complexities of the situation at hand. Head to my stories to find some resources that have helped me and also to see places to donate to. Infinite love, Quigs

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It’s taken me a few days to honestly even get this out . Ive shared in stories but its not enough. Having the platform that I do it wouldn’t be right if I didn’t say anything. I always try to be a light,spread positivity especially in dark times and will continue to do so but this needs to be said, it HAS to be said. What’s been happening for years and whats happening now is NOT okay. SPEAK UP FRIENDS,USE YOUR VOICE! Don’t let this be something you share and forget about the next day. I will continue to be an ally online/offline , to educate myself/others, show empathy/understanding & ALWAYS fight for those who may not be seen or heard. Change doesn’t come when you wait for someone else to do it and i say that all the time! I have always loved without barriers, judgement and will stand firm in what I believe in. POC I see you , I hear you and will ALWAYS stand with you ! ❤ #blacklivesmatter ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ P.s I wish more understood that when that is said ^ , its not saying you (other race) doesn’t matter but CLEARLY society thinks differently about POC and thats NOT okay. Not with me.. For every one person that doesn’t agree with this post though , there are 1000x more to stand with me! I love you all . If you made it this far down thank you for hearing my heart & taking the time to read. We HAVE to do more guys. ✊🏿✊🏼✊🏽✊🏾✊🏻 Sign The Petitions, Share Their Voices, Support Them, Donate Your Time, Donate Your Money,Advocate. DO SOMETHING. ❤ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ #silenceisviolence #useyourvoice #endracism #icantbreathe #inspireothers #blm #makeachange

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I haven’t known exactly what to say. Or do. Or how to help. But I want you to know I am here to listen & learn. The series of events happening in LA and around the US are not ok. Change cannot happen if people stay silent and turn away from the uncomfortable. Poppy is still young, but we try to instill in her everyday that everyone is equal. And to treat everyone with compassion. I truly believe she doesn’t see color, her love for everyone is so pure and it is our job to make sure that she continues to feel that way. Compassion starts at home. We can work together to make the future better. I have been sharing posts and resources in my stories over the last few days but I know that is not enough. Here are the actions that I am taking: 1. Having conversations with my family and educating ourselves on how we can do the work together to make a change. 2. Supporting POC owned businesses and resources (please share any that you have so I can continue to share) 3. Reaching out in meaningful way to my friends who are hurting in a way that is not triggering and supportive. 4. Donating to and Sharing organizations that are accepting donations and signatures supporting change. Let me know what else I can do and what you are doing to drive change. Let me know how I can help to be an ally and educate me on things I do not know. Let’s inspire each other. #blacklivesmatter

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